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Shattered families: The perilous intersection of immigration enforcement and the child welfare system

 

Thousands of children stuck in foster care after parents deported, report finds

A report from the Applied Research Center, released in November 2011, reveals yet another devastating consequence of the enforcement-only approach to immigration: a startling number of children whose parents have been detained and deported are placed in foster care and face enormous barriers reuniting with their families. According to the ARC, one in four people deported in FY 2011 (nearly 100,000 people) left behind a U.S. citizen child. The report found that the odds of reuniting the families are so low that the parents “basically fall off the face of the earth when it comes to the child welfare system.” Sadly, because of the regular increase in the number of annual deportations, this number is expected to triple in the next five years.

Go to the ARC website for more: Shattered families: The perilous intersection of immigration enforcement and the child welfare system.

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